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Why are chimpanzees aggressive?

Author :

Submitted : 2018-06-14 07:27:05    Popularity:     

Tags: chimpanzees  aggressive  

I've seen them on videos being aggressive, either with another chimp that just wanted attention from the dominant chimpanzees in order to be accepted as a dominant probably (he got attacked: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Yh1Em4Sdzec), or with each oth

Answers:

As someone pointed out, they have a common ancestor with the gorilla, but while the gorilla evolved into a magnificent animal, the chimp became smaller and uglier. In other words, typical little man.

Aggression in chimps is used for two primary purposes. One of these is to increase an individual's place in the dominance hierarchy. The hierarchy in chimpanzee society is linear. There are many advantages to being high in the hierarchy and male chimpanzees compete strongly to increase their status. Within a community aggression is mainly an intimidatory tactic; it being rare for it to turn into actual violence.

The other time that chimpanzees exert aggression is against neighbouring groups. In this case the aggression leads to physical violence. When two opposing groups meet this way, it is almost invariable that the larger group wins. members of the smaller group are likely to be killed, fatally injured or very seriously injured. Chimpanzees do not always engage in such fights when they accidentally cross each other’s paths but raiding parties may deliberately seek out other chimpanzee groups. Humans and chimpanzees are the only two species of animal that does this.

They are aggressive because of their evolutionary history. Chimpanzees shared an ancestor with the larger gorilla that dates back to about 6-7 million years ago. That means at one point in time they became separate species. Both the chimp and the gorilla walk on their knuckles, which is something a heavy ape needs to do to support its weight and still keep its fists flexible for grasping things. That means the chimp's direct ancestor was about the size of the gorilla and it evolved to be smaller. Because it is smaller and because it lives in the same area as the gorilla the chimp is excluded from the best, most productive areas by the gorilla.

Because its habitat is less productive, the chimp basically had to evolve to be smaller so that it requires less food. One may think of chimps being big apes that lost territorial battles with the gorilla a long time ago and they then were driven away from the best areas and had to evolve to be smaller to survive. Because its habitat is less productive, the gorilla cannot find enough food where chimps live, so the chimp can live in relative peace. Despite being free from harassment by the gorilla, the amount of habitat the chimp lives in is limited, and therefore chimps had to fight other chimps for territory. Male chimps will stay in the troop they were born into for life, and they band together with other males of the same troop to defend their territories against neighboring troops of chimps. Female chimps, OTOH, tend to leave the troop they were born in either temporarily when they are in heat or permanently to avoid excessive inbreeding.

The story does not end there because chimps are the closest relative of humans, and our ancestor had to eke out a living in the African savanna, where humans evolved, because our ape ancestors were even weaker than the ancestor of the chimps. All of these happened because the African continent began drying starting about 5 million years ago and the forests were shrinking. Another line of evidence that supports this scenario is the fact that the bonobo evolved from the common chimp about 2 million years ago. The bonobo is found in a small area, across the Congo River from the chimp and gorilla. since apes cannot swim, the bonobo was able to occupy the area, which is highly productive. Because food is so plentiful, bonobos spend very little time each day looking for food. Although bonobos still form troops, they are less aggressive towards their neighbors because there is plenty of food for everyone. Another reason bonobos are less aggressive is that they have lots of sex everyday. Apparently the 1960s slogan "make love not war" works for some animals, not just humans. .

it's tough living in the wild
being aggressive works for them

Evolution.

Who knows?

Gang culture



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